perfectrhyme

Follow
Perfectrhyme's photo

A flashforward or flash-forward is the opposite of a flashback.

Not enough for you? OK, it’s:

  1. a device in the narrative of a motion picture, novel, etc., by which a future event or scene is inserted into the chronological structure of the work.
  2. an event or scene so inserted.

A related term is prolepsis, sometimes used as a synonym, and more generally meaning:

the representation or assumption of a future act or development as if presently existing or accomplished.

Examples

Muriel Spark’s 1961 novel The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie makes extensive use of flash-forwards, revealing key details about its young characters' adult lives (and deaths) in advance. Amy Bloom’s novel Away (2007) uses a similar style of flash-forward, by way of providing mini-epilogues for her characters. Kurt Vonnegut’s Slaughterhouse-Five (1969) flashes constantly backward and forward in its tale of a man who has “come unstuck in time.”

The Ghost of Christmas Future episode in Charles Dickens’s A Christmas Carol is another famous instance of literary prolepsis. And the most famous instance of televised prolepsis? The flash-forwards in Season 4 of Lost:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zzjEBU-r9SU

This video is processing – it'll appear automatically when it's done.

Show other contributors +

A little something like this:

Direwolves were once a real species—a heavier version of the modern wolf, found in North and South America—although they’ve long since gone extinct.

This video is processing – it'll appear automatically when it's done.

Show other contributors +

Except arguably heat?

Recall that the name of the series of which A Game of Thrones is part is A Song of Ice and Fire. Imagery of freezing and burning forms a running motif throughout the series.

Related: freezer burn is the worst.

This video is processing – it'll appear automatically when it's done.

Show other contributors +

i.e., gave him an eerie feeling or made his hair stand on end. Hackles are the feathers on the back of a chicken, or the hairs on the back of the neck of an animal, especially a dog.

This video is processing – it'll appear automatically when it's done.

Show other contributors +

Just like in the ORIGINAL multi-narrative immersive gaming experience: the Choose Your Own Adventure books!

This video is processing – it'll appear automatically when it's done.

Show other contributors +

April 14th, 2014

Always kept my finger on the decision page…

Add a suggestion

Check out the original (1980) Japanese version of Pac-Man:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=glYGt7mFCaQ

This video is processing – it'll appear automatically when it's done.

Show other contributors +

Untreated frostbite can cause digits and other extremities to become gangrenous and fall off.

This video is processing – it'll appear automatically when it's done.

Show other contributors +

“Wildlings” is the derogatory name by which the people of the Seven Kingdoms refer to the Free Folk, or the people inhabiting the lands beyond the Wall.

This video is processing – it'll appear automatically when it's done.

Show other contributors +

Garron or garron is a Scottish/Irish term for a type of small horse or pony.

This video is processing – it'll appear automatically when it's done.

Show other contributors +

A destrier is a generic term for a large, strong war horse, usually a stallion. Destriers carried knights in the Middle Ages.

This video is processing – it'll appear automatically when it's done.

Show other contributors +

"'What a porpoise you do grow!'" (Charles Dickens – DAVID COPPERFIELD (CHAP. 9)) | accepted

I think she’s saying he’s getting fat!

""Where are your books? that light bequeath'd" (William Wordsworth – Expostulation and Reply) | accepted

But this is coming in the context of books, right? So this could be “light” as in the enlightenment that great human thought brings?

Granted “light” has biblical resonances, but it also has a lot of other resonances, including within the context of Wordsworth’s work as a whole. I don’t see anything about Jesus here specifically.

"To bed, to bed!" (William Shakespeare – Macbeth Act 5 Scene 1) | pending

True. But what effect does it create?

"Why in the world do we need to know the name of O’Hara’s ..." (Austin Allen – Close Reading: Frank O'Hara, "The Day Lady Died") | accepted

Not ruling it out…

"Ing was | NOT EASY." (A. B. Schmidt – A Simpler Lesson in Prosody -- Roethke's "My Papa's Waltz") | accepted

Arguably the “was” is stressed, though, creating a line of two iambs and a spondee.

"I have heard that hysterical women say" (William Butler Yeats – Lapis Lazuli) | pending

Great annotation. I’m not sure we have quite enough evidence to connect “that raving slut” with Maud — you’re almost certainly right that Yeats has her in mind there, but there are a couple other, more clear-cut references we can probably point to — including this one from earlier in the same poem:

I thought my dear must her own soul destroy
So did fanaticism and hate enslave it…

"Like the author in his book," (Austin Allen – Hidden Threads: Revisiting "Charlotte's Web") | pending

I like Flaubert’s advice, but I think it has its limits. There are great authors who are extremely “intrusive,” putting themselves unabashedly front and center: that’s the whole point, the whole show. Then again, they’re usually showing off a carefully crafted persona—a fiction.

"THE CHAPTER OF BEING TRANSFORMED INTO THE PRINCE OF THE T..." (The Papyrus of Ani – Magic for the Afterlife II) | accepted

Broken image

"Yet many a man is making friends with death" (Edna St. Vincent Millay – Love is not all (Sonnet XXX)) | pending

Is this the turn, or is it two lines lower?

"11 Greet my relative Herodion." (St. Paul – Romans 16 (NRSV)) | rejected

Wonderful comments, all. Thank you!