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The Oatmeal has a perfect example here.

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The queen is all about her social media!

Web Site: http://janetmock.com/
Facebook: /janetmock
Twitter: @janetmock
Instagram: @janetmock
Tumblr: janetmock
Goodreads: Janet Mock
Pintrest: janetmock
Poetry Genius: Coming Soon???

#RedefiningRealness #JanetMock #TWOC #GetItTheFuckTogether

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Mock is really passionate about the importance of sharing one’s story: first to one’s self, and then to others. For example, in the video below Sylvia Rivera shares her personal story to transform a hostile audience into a crowd that rallied behind her in unison.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vUke4_LOUA4

On her book tour (and other engagements), Mock shares her space with multiple other women of color — the foremothers that came before her and the sisters that stand with her. She makes the distinction that her voice is one of many, not one for many.

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In chemistry, trans is a term of relative orientation meaning one part is on the opposite side from another. The opposite, cis, is when both parts are on the same side.

Although the trans in transgender and transsexual doesn’t share the same origin or exact meaning with the trans in chemistry, the cistrans paradigm can be very useful. In a way, it offers an easy to understand analogy: you have two parts (your gender identity and your assigned sex at birth), and they can either be aligned (cis) or misaligned (trans). This kind of language doesn’t inherently privilege one condition over another.

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All of these terms are problematic, and using them in this way is frowned upon.

  • Real. This term privileges people whose gender identity matches their body well. It implies that only those people are real men or real women. Those who experience “deviant” gender identities are not legitimate or authentic. This notion, of course, is the complete opposite of what this book aims to do.
  • Genetic. This term is too limiting. It implies that sex and gender can be reduced to DNA, which is not true. There’s so much more at play! It also suggests that trans women are somehow non-genetic women.
  • Biological. This term can be useful clinically and even politically/critically (i.e., when speaking of specifically female issues like abortion or pregnancy, it may be useful to use the term biosex female). But it’s still inadequate to describe non-trans people; being trans does not negate one’s very real and tangible biology.
  • Natural. This is another term that privileges non-trans bodies, treating them as “normal” and “expected” products of nature. Implicitly it says that trans people are aberrative.

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Self identification is an important critical tool. It places the power back with the individual instead of with oppressive systems that impose labels from the outside. Identity is a subjective experience and a private sense of self, so people should be allowed the liberty to define and author the terms of that identity.

Here is a conversation Janet Mock has with Isis King, one of the most visible transgender people on television, about labels and terms used by others to describe trans experience.

Side note: Sexplanations has a good video about identity.

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As it turns out, most people in the book are somewhere in between. That’s usually the way it goes in real life, especially as you get to know people better. No one is a just a hero or just a villain — everyone is a little bit of both.

What’s interesting is that Janet Mock is able to convey that well-roundedness merely through words and in very short snapshots of these different people. Her writing is earnest and candid — the realness shines through.

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The whole book is delightfully sprinkled with short quotes from the “characters” we meet. Mock tried to allow these people to have their own voices here even though this is very much her story.

She interviewed her mother, father, brother, and best friend and artfully incorporated their own recollections into the prose where she recounted her memories. She talks more about the process of writing here.

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Throughout the book, Janet Mock uses this term — my truth — to talk about her realness being shared through this memoir. The term carries more weight than simply my story because it asserts its validity right off the bat.

In a world where trans women of color are denied their space, their voice, and their representation, it’s important to lead with the assertion that TWOC experiences are real and valid. This language is a direct critical response to multiple, intersecting systems of oppression that erase and silence real portrayals of TWOC.

When speaking across difference and across privilege, Janet Mock is fighting a status quo that tells her that her personal history is made up, fake, and not valid.

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Annotations are an integral part of the art of close reading.

Something special happens when a reader interacts with a text. That’s where meaning is born, out of that interaction, out of interpretation. So to answer questions about any sort of text, we must first answer questions about how that text is read.

In the process of close reading, each part of the text is analyzed and given special, careful attention. Genius annotations facilitate that process of sustained interpretation and make it shareable, open for anyone to read along and contribute.

Give texts the 21st century treatment they deserve.

Simply put, this technology allows us to talk about texts in a way that was impossible before. For each line of text we could build a conversation around multimedia, images, links to external sources, links to other parts of the text, and even bring in the author’s perspective. With annotations, reading becomes a public and social activity, and with that come all the perks of social media/social networks.

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"He had this suspicion because Cassius a man of fierce opp..." (Mr. Varnell – Caesar Essays For Peer Review) | pending

"I bathed in the Euphrates when dawns were young." (Mr. Z – 1st Period: “The Negro Speaks of Rivers”) | pending

Hughes shows interest in his culture and heritage by using imagery.

That’s a great starting point. What’s the significance of the river Euphrates here? How does that tie in with heritage?

"Nicki's verse from "Senile"" (DTDG – My Best Annotations (NO STRETCHING)) | pending

@DTGD The comment section here doesn’t lend itself to a lot of back and forth, so I won’t be spending much time replying to your replies here, especially considering I think the initial feedback is pretty well fleshed out. But to address some of what you mentioned…

I didn’t say there was a “unifying theme”

If you’re not breaking down the entire verse, i.e., the verse a whole instead of its parts, don’t create a annotation on the reference [Verse 2: Nicki Minaj]. Simple as that.

I quoted her words exactly, so I don’t see how that was 3rd person, she when used an impersonal pronoun “I” and not her real name or MC name.

Pay attention to the orange arrows.

FYI, I’m removing all the featured artists you added here. I don’t think that’s appropriate, and it sets a bad precedent. I hope you understand.

"Tomi Fischer" (Rap Genius – Moderator Contact Listing) | pending

Can we separate this moderator list into relevant categories: Tomi Fischer vs non-Tomi Fischer?

"Scratch and sniff stickers designed to evoke the smell of..." (Ken Baumann – 199X (Chapter 1: EarthBound)) | accepted

Haru, There are references to this later on and in other annotations. I feel like it’s nice to spread that out without repeating that same fact in different tates.

"6. Are you supportive or against the theme of misogynisti..." (Faek-Records – My ƒÆʞ Survey for #UniversityResearch) | pending

So you support a less explicit version of hatred towards women on the basis of their gender?

"6. Are you supportive or against the theme of misogynisti..." (Faek-Records – My ƒÆʞ Survey for #UniversityResearch) | pending

What does that mean?

"D . H . Lawrence" (College Board – AP English Literature and Composition Representative Authors) | pending

He really is beautiful. Look at those eyes!