William Shakespeare – Insults

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The Two Noble Kinsmen

"Thou art baser than a cutpurse."

As You Like It
"I do desire we may be better strangers."
(3.2.248)


The Comedy of Errors
"He is deformed, crooked, old and sere, ill-faced, worse bodied, shapeless everywhere; vicious, ungentle, foolish, blunt, unkind; stigmatical in making, worse in mind."

"Thou whoreson, senseless villain!"

"Dissembling harlot, thou art false in all!"
(4.4.100)

Coriolanus
"You abilities are too infant-like for doing much alone."
(2.1.36)

"They lie deadly that tell you you have good faces."
(2.1.59)


"You wear out a good wholesome forenoon in hearing a cause between an orange wife and a fosset-seller."
(2.1.68-9)

"More of your conversation would infect my brain."
(2.1.91)

"For such things as you, I can scarce think there's any, ye're so slight."
-(5.1.108-9)

"The tartness of his face sours ripe grapes."
(5.4.18)

"There is no more mercy in him than there is milk in a male tiger."
(5.4.30)

Cymbeline
"Away! Thou'rt poison to my blood."
(1.1.128)

"O thou vile one!"
(1.1.142)

"You had measured how long a fool you were upon the ground."
(1.2.26)

Hamlet
"Frailty, thy name is woman!"
(1.2.147)

"They have a plentiful lack of wit."
(2.2.198)


"Take you me for a sponge?
(4.2.13)

"Here, thou incestuous, murderous, damned Dane, drink off this potion!"
(5.2.335-6)

Henry IV
"Thou leathern-jerkin, crystal-button, knot-pated, agatering, puke-stocking, caddis-garter, smooth-tongue, Spanish pouch!"

"What a slave art thou to hack thy sword as thou hast done, and then say it was in a fight"

"His wit's as thick as a Tewkesbury mustard"

"Thou hast the most unsavoury similes."
(1.2.75)

"This sanguine coward, this bed-presser, this horseback-breaker, this huge hill of flesh!"
(2.4.225-6)

"'Sblood, you starveling, you elf-skin, you dried neat's tongue, you bull's pizzle, you stock-fish! O for breath to utter what is like thee! you tailor's-yard, you sheath, you bowcase; you vile standing-tuck!"
(2.4.227-9)

"Peace, ye fat guts!"

"There’s no more faith in thee than in a stewed prune."
(3.3.40)

"Hang him, swaggering rascal!"
(2.4.66)

"I scorn you, scurvy companion."
(2.4.115)

"Away, you mouldy rogue, away!"
(2.4.117)

"Away, you cut-purse rascal! you filthy bung, away! By this wine, I'll thrust my knife in your mouldy chaps, an you play the saucy cuttle with me. Away, you bottle-ale rascal! you basket-hilt stale juggler, you!"
(2.4.120-22)

Henry V
"[His] face is not worth sunburning."
(5.3)

"O braggart vile and damned furious wight!"
(2.1.100)

"Avaunt, you cullions!"
(3.2.20)

"Such antics do not amount to a man."
(3.2.28)

"He is white-livered and red-faced."
(3.2.30)

"They were devils incarnate."
(2.3.32)

Henry VI
"They are hare-brain'd slaves."
(1.2.38)

"Hag of all despite!"
(3.2.54)

"Take her away; for she hath lived too long, to fill the world with vicious qualities."
(5.4.30-1)

"I had rather chop this hand off at a blow, and with the other fling it at thy face."
(5.1.51-2)

"Thou mis-shapen Dick!"
(5.5.35)


"You scullion! You rampallian! You fustilarian! I’ll tickle your catastrophe!"

All's Well That Ends Well
"Methink’st thou art a general offence and every man should beat thee."
(2.3)

"Your virginity breeds mites, much like a cheese."

"This woman's an easy glove, my lord, she goes off and on at pleasure."
(5.3)

"You are more saucy with lords and honourable personages than the commission of your birth and virtue gives you heraldry.."
(1160)

Macbeth
"Go, prick thy face, and over-red thy fear, Thou lily-liver’d boy."
(5.3)

Much Ado About Nothing
"Four of his five wits went halting off, and now is the whole man governed with one."

Othello
"Heaven truly knows that thou are as false as hell."
(4.2)

Measure For Measure
"Thou'rt by no means valiant; For thou dost fear the soft and tender fork of a poor worm."
Act III

Twelfth Night
"By my life, this is my lady's hand, these be her very C's, her U's, and her T's, and thus makes she her great P's. It is, in contempt of question, her hand."

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