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Grant Schubert asked his students to identify rhetorical appeals in Swift’s satire.

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Dr. Wigginton’s students compare Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson on topics like nature and death.

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Pay attention to that capital O.

This is one of Martin’s great sentences. At first read, the others may simply be referring to Ser Waymar and Gared, but when you notice the capital O, you realize the Others are something else entirely.

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Characters clinging to status and ceremony as social and even existential norms are called into question is just one kind of human folly Martin revels in throughout the series.

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"Does it stink like rotten meat?" (Mr. Z – 6th Period: Langston Hughes’s “Harlem”) | pending

Remember you’re trying to make an interpretive claim that you can apply to the whole poem. Make sure you link your ideas about this line to the themes of the poem as a whole.

"Or fester like a sore— / And then run?" (Mr. Z – 6th Period: Langston Hughes’s “Harlem”) | pending

This is the start of a good claim but I think you can make it even stronger. What types of things might happen if a dream is deferred? Are the images positive or negative? Is Hughes writing only of his own dreams or the dreams of others too?

"Or does it explode" (Mr. Z – 5th Period: Langston Hughes’s “Harlem”) | pending

Is an explosion just destruction or might it also be a release? What happens to energy in an explosion? What might that tell us about dreams in this poem?

"Maybe it just sags / Like a heavy load." (Mr. Z – 5th Period: Langston Hughes’s “Harlem”) | pending

This is a great comment. Let’s push this idea further and think about the poem’s structure as well — why would this possibility get its own stanza? What does that tell us about this idea in relation to those that came before and the one to follow?

"Does it stink like rotten meat?" (Mr. Z – 5th Period: Langston Hughes’s “Harlem”) | pending

What makes a piece of meat rot? How could this happen to a dream? What might happen to a person with a dream deferred that would make Hughes use the image of rotten meat?

"And then run?" (Mr. Z – 5th Period: Langston Hughes’s “Harlem”) | pending

Think about a literal sore (gross I know) — it festers and ultimately will drip or run when it pops (like fluid draining). It’s a pretty messy and very physical image — why would Hughes use it to describe a dream deferred?

"I, too, am America." (Mr. Z – 1st Period: Langston Hughes’s “I, Too, Sing America” (3)) | pending

Think about the difference between saying “I, too, am American” and “I, Too, Am America” — which one do you think is a stronger claim? What does it mean to BE America?

"They'll see how beautiful I am / And be ashamed--" (Mr. Z – 1st Period: Langston Hughes’s “I, Too, Sing America” (3)) | pending

Is it that they’ll be ashamed by his beauty or how they treated him previously? What does this suggest about the speaker’s attitude toward the future?

"I, too, sing America. / I am the darker brother." (Mr. Z – 1st Period: Langston Hughes’s “I, Too, Sing America” (3)) | pending

Check out Walt Whitman’s poem “I Hear America Singing” — might this poem and these lines be a response to Whitman? If so, how is Hughes challenging and expanding on Whitman’s poem?

"My soul has grown deep like the rivers." (Mr. Z – 5th Period: “The Negro Speaks of Rivers”) | pending

And what in the life do you think caused his soul to grow deep — was it the passing of time itself or particular kinds of experience and knowledge?