Lucky_Desperado

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There’s nothing wrong in a sense in worshipping Lebron James—though many would argue that the “hoop dream” of a career in the NBA is not truly a viable escape out of poverty. Learning the business of professional basketball, however, would be a valuable course of study, sports business being a more likely career path.

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“Paris” is a powerful metaphor here and in black culture more broadly. It stands in for “high,” cosmopolitan culture and social mobility, both largely inaccessible to African Americans during slavery and before the Civil Rights Movement.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FfM_wS7qYfY&feature=kp

This metaphor Paris is also invoked by Kanye West and Jay Z in their “Niggas in Paris” hit, though the song was literally recorded in the French city:

If you escaped what I've escaped, you'd be in Paris getting fucked up too
― “Niggas in Paris” by Kanye West

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Coates is alluding (and linking) to his memoir, The Beautiful Struggle.

http://www.amazon.com/Beautiful-Struggle-Father-Unlikely-Manhood/dp/0385527462?tag=vglnk-c53-20

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A well-regarded public school in Baltimore with an emphasis on STEM disciplines.

Apparently, this non-mistake—TNC notes below he never actually graduated from Poly—has since been rectified on Wikipedia.

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Orwell worked for the British Imperial Police in Burma for five years from 1922 to 1927. He wrote the novel Burmese Days in response to these experiences, which left him largely disillusioned with British imperialism.

You can read the chapter, “Shooting an Elephant”—often anthologized as a personal essay rather than a short story—over on Poetry Genius.

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Battle of Algiers is an Italian neo-realist film directed by Gillo Pontecorvo. It depicts fictionalized events relating to the Algerian War (with France).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ca3M2feqJk8

That this is the movie Marquez has the parents go to see at this climactic moment in the story perhaps foreshadows the tragic ending.

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Both the children and adults live out their fantasies on Wednesday nights, though the parents in more sublimated fashion through the normal tradition of going to the movies.

Marquez chooses films significantly. Last Tango in Paris, directed by Bernardo Bertolucci and starting Marlon Brando, is about an American who begins an adulterous relationship with a French woman. The film was given an X rating for its sexual content.

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The fantasy of the children originates in their taking seriously a simile used by the grandfather to explain how light works.

The miscommunication highlights—sorry!—the differences between the world of the child and that of the adult. It is the naiveté—or genius—of the boys that they make the narrator’s metaphor literal.

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Cartagena de Indias is a city on the northern coast of Columbia whereas Madrid is a city in central Spain, indeed, with no proximity to a coast (or any major body of water).

This story is from Marquez’s collection Strange Pilgrims, in which all the characters are South American exiles in Europe.

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Like great epics of that past, namely Greek classics such as The Iliad and The Odyssey, A Game of Thrones opens en medias res (“in the midst of things”). Moreover, the opening is particularly ominous with Gared “urging” the travelers to turnaround as a “darkness” descends on the scene. It’s quite clear even in this first line that something wicked this way comes.

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"26th of July Movement" (President John F. Kennedy – Letter to Chairman Khrushchev) | rejected

kjb

"I liked the last best because its leaves were yellow." (James Joyce – Araby) | accepted

That he likes the last book best not for its contents but for its appearance—literally judging a book by its cover—is indicative of his naiveté.

"And can you, by no drift of circumstance, / Get from him ..." (Model Teacher – William Shakespeare’s “Hamlet Act 3 Scene 1”) | pending

Of course, Hamlet too is “putting on” an act of madness—this is a play where everyone is playing each other.

"Leeches," (F. Scott Fitzgerald – The Great Gatsby (Chapter IV)) | pending

In this particular use of an animal, perhaps Fitzgerald is implicitly commenting on the “leeching” nature of those from East Egg who have enjoyed their wealth at the expense of the lower class.

"Contend in a sea" (Model Teacher – William Carlos Williams’s “The Yachts”) | pending

awesome discussion here!

"א וַיְדַבֵּר יְהוָה, אֶל-מֹשֶׁה לֵּאמֹר. / ב דַּבֵּר אֶל-..." (Holy Bible (Hebrew) – Leviticus Chapter 19 (וַיִּקְרָא)) | pending

But isn’t this counterintuitive? Why must the people of Israel, who are guaranteed holiness in this sentence just based on their affiliation with God, do all of these other things too? Shouldn’t it be enough to just believe in God?

"The bottom of Neo-Harlem provides the same courteous serv..." (Lupe Fiasco – Teriyaki Joe: Neo-Harlem Detective (Chapter Five: Gumbo)) | accepted

While the cities are said to be “in no particular order,” the listing of Neo-Orleans second cannot be ignored given its significance in recent African American history with the devastation hurricane Katrina wrought disproportionally on black communities there.

Kanye West commented on the human disaster that was hurricane

"Black reapers" (Ms. Baaith – Jean Toomer’s “Reapers”) | pending

Does “black” have a racial connotation here?

"Like a patient etherized upon a table" (Model Teacher – T.S. Eliot’s “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock” (Spring 2014)) | pending

The whole line evokes a kind of tragedy rather than the romance signaled in the opening.

"To sing of wars, of captains, and of kings, / Of cities f..." (Anne Bradstreet – The Prologue) | pending

In general, Bradstreet is evoking the epic tradition of invoking the muses for poetic inspiration. By and large, these epics, like Homer’s Iliad were “manly” tales about war, etc.