Lil_Maddie

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Here Kipling is promoting an ideal that fits into the Victorian conception of white masculinity: stoic perseverance. If you are able to lose everything you value and still get back up, it shows true dedication. This can also relate to colonialism: being truly dedicated to an imperialist cause means being able to “keep on keeping on” regardless of how grim your situation is…

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Die Antwoord is famous for dissing other high profile members of the music industry. Now that Ninja. Yolandi, and DJ Hi-Tek have made it, they can now “Fuck the system” on a whole new level.

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If Ninja hadn’t challenged authority, he never would have made it as an artist and performer.

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Here Yolandi is saying two things with one line. She references the pre-conceived notions about South Africa by saying “rumble in the jungle.” The phrase also refers to how Die Antwoord is shaking up the rap game with their new freaky sound.

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Bhikkhu
January 10th, 2013

“The Rumble in the Jungle” is the famous match between Muhammad Ali and George Foreman. Probably the most famous boxing match ever… It took place in Kinshasa, Zaire, Africa. Despite of being both Afro-Americans, Ali represented Africa and Foreman represented America… I presume the message is: “We are Muhammad Ali and you, American rappers, are George Foreman… Fight fight fight!"
Ali won by knocking out Foreman in the eighth round.

Bhikkhu
January 11th, 2013

They also quoted Mike Tyson in “Fok Julle Naaiers”… is Ninja a Boxing lover? :D

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Yolandi is referencing the flashy displays of wealth associated with rappers that have “made it”

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Ninja doesn’t care what haters have to say. His fan base is so strong that you can’t influence him.

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December 30th, 2012

He has a lot of clout when it comes to his fans. It’s one of those I say jump you say how high type of thing.

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“Emissary of light” is a phrase repeated throughout the novella, indicating its significance. Its general meaning here is one of a sort of torchbearer of civilization. It implies that Marlow’s duty, or England’s duty, is to go onward and spread the “light” of order, of technology, and of Christianity, indicated by the use of “apostle.”

In the context of Marlow’s aunt, the phrase is used very sincerely versus Marlow’s own cynical use of it earlier. It embodies what traditional women, and therefore traditional England, thought of imperialism: that it was a glorious, honorable duty to go forth like Jesus or a disciple and convert people of other cultures to “modern society.” In this case, Marlow’s aunt truly does think of her nephew as something of a disciple.

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The description of the houses here parallels the original “Dick and Jane” passage at the beginning of the novel.

Here is the house.
It is green and white.
It has a red door.
It is very pretty.

(Morrison, 3)

These “quiet black neighborhoods” are the equivalent of the suburban paradise Dick and Jane enjoy. In a world where assimilation is the number one goal, owning one of these cute, prim and proper homes is the embodiment of “making it,” or achieving the American Dream. The imagery of “porch swings,” cut grass, and lovely flowers suggests a well kept home, but also a manufactured perfection or cleanliness.

  • The “ivy” mentions implies a tie to the old wealth, or sophisticated class of living. Could it be trying to emulate the Buchanan’s home?

It also relates directly to the passage in Autumn regarding the Outdoors, reaffirming the cyclical nature of Morrison’s writing.

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The word choice in this passage is crucial to what Fitzgerald tries to convey with the Eggs. Their “enormous” stature represents the economic prosperity of their residents. They are “identical” in financial stability, but “separated” from each other with social standing.

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This first sentence contrasts with the previous passage about Big Mama’s kitchen because it compares the natural sensations with artificial sensations. Instead of the “smell of lilacs”, Claudia senses “the acridness of tin plates and cups.” She feels cheated out of her own reality of happiness, for it has now been replaced with manufactured pleasures that she does not enjoy.

This difference between the “real” and the “manufactured” represents the contrast of blackness and whiteness in Claudia’s society, the blackness being the real, authentic experience she wishes for versus the “fake” experiences everyone tells her she’s supposed to enjoy.

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"Let's be clear, I'm a leader, not your peer / Valedictori..." (Big Boi – You Ain't No DJ) | accepted

Here Big Boi asserts his leadership over other members of the rap game.

As Valedictorian, he’s not only the big man, but also more intelligent than your average rapper on the block. His lyrics are quicker, faster, and generally smarter than what you’d typically see.

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